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Checkpoint Charlie, but Panda Express

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Checkpoint Charlie, but for Panda Express

San Francisco has been friendly many times to the first – first cable car. First “be-in” and Google Glass. Therefore, it was not surprising that it became America’s first great city to walk. San Francisco requires proof for indoor restaurants and bars, gyms, theaters, and gatherings of over a thousand people. The delta variant was the reason for all of this vigilance. It also gave the chance to give a push to those who were still struggling. Seventy-nine per cent of eligible residents were vaccinated when the rule was in effect. This is a percentage the Mayor of London Breed called “amazing”. But there were still objections. And if they didn’t fear death, they might tremble at the thought that it would be cloudy. This rule was in effect on Friday of summer, and will be enforced by New York on September 13th.

What is the daily life in Vaxxien? It’s pretty well researched. A commuter arrived in San Francisco the other day and stopped at Sam’s Korean-American diner, City Hall, for breakfast. A waiter stopped him before he could get through the door. “Do you have any evidence?” He boomed. He blasted, feeling defensive and low in caffeine. The commuter reached for his vaccination card and struggled to find it. It looked like something that a teenage boy would have made to leave school. The waiter smiled and nodded, continuing to serve the Chilaquiles.

The commuter went to Chinatown’s Z & Y Sichuan restaurant for spicy noodles. The children were stopped at their door and interrogated. (“She’s twelve!”Shouted a desperate mom. The commuter reached for his papers. The waitress looked at him, but didn’t see. It was like dealing with TSA. No one was arrested. After searching for his card for several minutes, the cashier from Philz Coffee decided to take her chances. She replied, “You know the truth, we’re closing within fifteen minutes and no one is here so I just trust it you have it.” But wait! But wait! The cashier bent to inspect the card, her eyebrows furrowed and her brow furrowing in puzzlement. It was an expression he hadn’t expected to see from someone who has studied his medical records. Finally, she said “Okay.” “Thanks very Much!”

Later: Cannoli at Caffe Trieste – the North Beach’s old hashhouse that’s popular with beats. It was beautiful and everyone outside was full. You were inside? No soul. The woman working in the cannoli counter demanded his papers as well as his ID. Perhaps he had robbed a tourist who was vaccinated. Hot bombolon was offered to the young employee who operates an espresso machine. “What is the matter?” The man looked at the digital pass and said, “What the hell?” “Where did this data come from?” Are the data there? “He took a closer look.” What’s the matter? “The ID never happened.

“Please think outside of the box.”

Marisa Accocella: Caricature

Stonestown’s mall had all its indoor tables gone, with the exception of a few scattered in the middle. This was a very common practice. The Ferry Building’s upscale dining hall banned any surface that could cause a bout of food poisoning. The plexiglass stands were manned by a security specialist. It felt like crossing Checkpoint Charlie. You had access to Frozen Yogurt or Panda Express. Were there many guests undocumented that the security guard encountered?

“I do,” she stated, leaning forward conspiratorially. “But there’s a way around it. I’ll help. This was connected to even more bureaucracy. The people were appeased by the sale of massages on a row of nearby chairs. There was no need to complete paperwork.

What about a movie? One theater’s answer was, “Well, why not?” The only requirement to purchase a ticket to Don’t Breathe 2 or to sit in the dark theatre was to be at least 18 years old to watch an R-rated film. Multiplexing was not a risk that the seats were full of, so common sense may prevail. Do not breathe.

It is time to have a beer. A commuter ordered Lagunitas during a dive through the avenues. The bartender verified that there were no masks in the group and pulled the tap. “Some places don’t ask at all. In some places you need your ID and Vax card, ”She agreed. Is the business changing? She said, “Honestly, this shift is the first I have to request.” But not really. “But not really. They are mostly regulars.”They are mainly regulars.” ♦

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