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Frances Stein, a fashion power at several companies, dies at the age of 83

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Frances Stein, a fashion power at several companies, dies at the age of 83

Frances Stein, who was a fashion editor, fashion muse and designer for Halston and Calvin Klein before reviving the Chanel house, died on June 6th in her Paris apartment. She was 83.

Her brother, Mark Patiki, confirmed the death but gave no cause.

Halston praised her editorial eye. So did Mr. Klein, who also compared her to a young Katharine Hepburn, but chilled to her when a tabloid journalist described his collections as designed by “Calvin Stein”. Diana Vreeland, who gave Ms. Stein her first job in the fashion industry as hat editor at Harper’s Bazaar, thought she had pizazz.

“Frances was one of those iconic fashion editors,” says André Leon Talley, longtime Vogue editor, “with impeccable style and a certain mystique, and as intimidating as polished granite. One of the sacred monsters of this time. She wore cashmere as if it were sable. “

She also had a temper. As a young editor, she was known for throwing things – including coffee and scissors – when they were dissatisfied.

Ms. Stein grew up in an era when fashion divas were encouraged to run rampage, but also when American style was newly on the rise. Inspired by the achievements of second wave feminism, women moved to work in pants, jackets, and sweaters, sleek styles that matched their newfound economic, social, and sexual mobility. Frau Stein was one of those who taught them how to dress.

She was a student at Smith College and had just returned from her junior year in Paris when Mrs. Vreeland, then fashion editor at Harper’s Bazaar, interviewed her. (Ms. Vreeland’s exaggerated personality and hyperbolic utterances were the model for a generation of editors.)

“The first thing Vreeland did was grab my hair and say, ‘That’s Russian hair,'” Ms. Stein told W magazine in 2005. People were expecting Rapunzel. ”(She had great hair, colleagues recalled.)

As the fashion editor, Ms. Stein reported on the man, then known as Roy Halston Frowick, who made hats for Bergdorf Goodman. When he started his own business in 1968, he asked Ms. Stein to become one of his partners. She was part of his intimate circle, along with the jewelry designer Elsa Peretti and the model and actress Marisa Berenson, about whom she said in her W interview: “We rang the doorbell, we swam, we went to the London flea market five times a year. We looked like we had come out of the Carpathian Mountains. “

As Fashion Director for Vogue, her next job after work for Halston, Ms. Stein styled a young Beverly Johnson for the cover of the August 1974 issue of magazine, becoming the first black model to feature on a Vogue cover. The historic photo, taken by Francesco Scavullo, shows Ms. Johnson in the casual style of the time, in a soft blue cashmere turtleneck with a twisted scarf around her neck.

“Frances was a perfectionist,” Ms. Johnson told Women’s Wear Daily after Ms. Stein’s death, recalling the shoot. “When I looked down at her, she tied the rust-colored scarf on me with a jewel pin maybe nearly 50 times before she felt it was just right.”

Frances Grace Patiki was born on September 21, 1937 in Huntington, NY, on Long Island. Her mother Frieda (Krakower) Patiki was a housewife; her father, Jacob Patiki, known as Jack, owned a department store in Kings Park. Frances attended Smith College for three years before dropping out to work at Harper’s Bazaar.

She joined Glamor Magazine as a fashion editor in the 1960s and then spent a few years designing for Halston. There she could, among other things, “tie a serious obi,” said Chris Royer, a former neck stonette, as the designer’s house models were called. (Ms. Royer was referring to one of Halston’s signature broad belts that included all kinds of precise loops and twists.) Habit of tucking orchids and gardenias into models’ hair.

As a fashion editor at Vogue, she reported on Mr. Klein, an intimate relationship that helped the young designer find an audience for his modern style. Mr. Klein and Mrs. Stein shared a similar aesthetic, an affinity for the muted tones – beige, sand, taupe and brown – that made up Mr. Klein’s collections, and he hired them as one of his designers.

This affinity may have led to their breakup. She told W that he fired her when The Daily News suggested that his collection be named “Calvin Stein”.

“We were very much on the same wavelength,” said Klein in a telephone interview. “She had an opinion and a point of view, and her choice of clothes was always right.”

In the late 1970s, Ms. Stein designed accessories and some individual parts for Chanel, which stalled after the death of its founder Coco Chanel in 1971. Ms. Stein’s modern take on Chanel classics – her plush leather bags, ballet flats, and cashmere sweaters – helped turn the company’s fortune.

This also applies to the designs by Karl Lagerfeld, who was employed shortly after Ms. Stein to design prt-à-porter and couture. The two had an icy relationship. Herr Lagerfeld complained about their behavior; he also said their designs clouded his vision for the company.

“I like some of her little cashmere sweaters and I don’t mind that she’s wearing all the duty-free jewelry,” Lagerfeld told Women’s Wear Daily in 1985.

Ms. Stein may not have been a fan of Mr. Lagerfeld’s work either. “I once made the mistake of asking her if she designed these pull-on boots,” said Jill Kargman, writer and star of the television comedy “Odd Mom Out,” who got close to Ms. Stein when Ms. Kargman’s father, Arie Kopelman, was President of Chanel.

“They were kind of round and flat, and it turned out that Karl had designed them,” said Ms. Kargman. “Anyway, they weren’t her style, which was more classic. She looked me in the eyes, puffed her nose and said, ‘I don’t make hooves.’ “

Ms. Stein also designed jewelry under her own name – huge cuffs, chokers, and earrings that look vaguely Byzantine or Etruscan.

“I try to create things that are visually irresistible, but they have to work too,” Ms. Stein told The Associated Press in 1989. “A bracelet is great when you can put it on and take it off and it doesn’t wind up in a typewriter or dribble into your plate when you make an elegant gesture.”

In addition to her brother, Mrs. Stein leaves behind a sister, Marilyn Vogler. Her marriage to the artist Ronald Stein ended in divorce.

A Chanel spokeswoman said Ms. Stein left the company about 20 years ago.

“I love what I do,” Ms. Stein told the New York Times in 1982, “but I’m a loner and I know I have a reputation for being difficult. That bothers me because most of the people who have worked with me know how hard I work on what I do. I am a perfectionist. “

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Parmigiani Fleurier launches new Tondagraph GT luxury watches

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Parmigiani Fleurier launches new Tondagraph GT luxury watches

Parmigiani Fleurier was the “Bugatti of watches” during a 15-year partnership with the French hypercar brand. And although Bugatti is now working with the New York-based brand Jacob & Co., the Swiss luxury watch manufacturer is still launching classy new models like the Tondagraph GT.

Parmigiani Florist Tondagraph GT (6)

With updated teardrop-shaped lugs for added tactility, an integrated strap (or rubber strap if buyer prefers), a subtle triangular guilloché ribbon motif, and fluted bezels inspired by Parmigiani Fleurier’s first Toric series, both versions have an opposing one Silver-plated main dial with a trio of black sub-dials.

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The Steel Silver Black Edition has a 42 mm case made of polished and satined stainless steel and is 100 meters water resistant. Although the name suggests a single chronograph, the caliber PF043 allows the watch to add an annual calendar.

Parmigiani Florist Tondagraph GT (3)

The well-known delta-shaped hands from Parmigiani Fluerier with black luminous coating indicate the time, while the date appears in a large double opening at 12 o’clock. Sub-dials at 9 and 6 o’clock show chronograph readings, and the sub-dial at 3 o’clock serves as both a running second and a date display.

“With this new model, we wanted to increase the contrast between the counters and the silver dial,” says Guido Terreni, CEO of Parmigiani Fleurier, about the contrasting white elements. “Taking out the orange indicators from the first edition helped us achieve a pure and long-lasting aesthetic.”

Parmigiani Florist Tondagraph GT (7)

A much more decadent design is the Tondagraph GT Rose Gold Silver, named for a 42mm case made of 18k rose gold that has a number of polished and brushed surfaces. The caliber PF071, which was developed in-house and is visible through a sapphire case back, benefits from sophisticated watchmaking technology.

The built-in chronograph function uses a column wheel instead of a cam for smoother operation and a vertical clutch instead of a horizontal one, which increases accuracy by allowing the chronograph to start without an initial jolt. Like all movements from Parmigiani Fleurier, the caliber PF071 is equipped with bevelled and hand-polished, sandblasted surfaces and a rotor made of 22 carat gold.

Parmigiani Florist Tondagraph GT (1)

The Parimigiani Fleruier Tondagraph GT collection starts at $ 20,400.

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Trump supports Ken Paxton because of George P. Bush in the Texas AG Race

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Trump supports Ken Paxton because of George P. Bush in the Texas AG Race

George P. Bush
Photo: LM Otero / AP / Shutterstock

In some ways, Donald Trump’s approval of Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton’s re-election offer was not a news event. Paxton is a dependable MAGA soldier who brought the monumentally stupid lawsuit Trump hoped would overturn 2020 election results in four narrow Biden-won states (the one by the US Supreme Court in December with the fairly obvious Grounds denied that Texas has no authority to challenge other states’ interpretations of state election laws). He also spoke at the infamous January 6 rally, headed by Trump, that instigated the Capitol uprising. The 45th President does not mind that Paxton is also being pursued by allegations of corruption.

But the endorsement is making headlines in Texas and nationwide because Paxton rival Trump was passed over: Land Commissioner George P. Bush, famously the only member of his political dynasty who Trump doesn’t like that much. There’s even a Trump quote to back up this assessment, which George P. made at his first campaign rally in June:

I missed the @georgepbush swag yesterday: The Koozie says, “That’s the only Bush who likes me. That’s the Bush who got it right. I like him” – Donald Trump #txlege pic.twitter.com / pFTzQCmoRG

– Scott Braddock (@scottbraddock) June 3, 2021

Bush the Younger was in fact endorsed by Trump for re-election as Land Commissioner in 2018 (in what is believed to be a mutual gesture for Bush’s support for Trump in the 2016 general election, when no one else in his family would offer it). The idea that he could grab another seal of approval was out of the question. But Paxton’s superior service to the cause could not evidently go unrewarded.

Paxton’s campaign will ensure that every single Republican in Texas knows of Trump’s “full and complete support,” as he characteristically put it. The bigger question, however, is whether Trump will make personal efforts for him beyond the formal nod. Paxton is in trouble thanks to a pending indictment (which he fought in state courts) based on whistleblowing allegations by his own staff (which Paxton later fired) that he was official of a donor who did free work on the AG house Proved a favor and gave a supposed Paxton lover a job. The FBI is investigating him on possible federal corruption and abuse of power charges that stem from the same allegations.

Paxton is an old professional at using ideology to trump (no pun intended) questions about his integrity; he was charged with treason fraud (first raised by a grand jury in 2015) when he was re-elected in 2018 with Trump’s support. He is still on these charges despite having repeatedly managed to postpone a trial.

The incumbent’s problems drew not only Bush but also former Texas Supreme Court Justice Eva Guzman to an initial challenge this year. The Land Commissioner, of course, has his own largely positive “brand” of Texas, along with access to serious money. Yes, Bush and Guzman could share the anti-Paxton primary, but Texass majority vote for nominations means either of them could force a runoff election. If GOP competition gets really nasty and divisive, there is a credible Democratic candidate (former Galveston Mayor Joe Jaworski, grandson of Watergate Special Prosecutor Leon Jaworski) who could take advantage of the divide in a purple trend.

Another thing to watch is whether the January 6th Democratic investigation will shed a bright light on Paxton’s involvement in instigating an insurgency – or, conversely, it will help him among Republicans, who mostly do it treat as a partisan witch hunt. The AG is already being investigated by the Texas Bar Association for its conduct on Jan. 6, and of course it is opposing this investigation as unconstitutional in court. The Lone Star State’s chief law enforcement officer certainly spends a lot of time in court addressing personal issues and asserting his trumpiness. Whether the Texans want this, his fate in the year 2022 may show.

Meanwhile, George P. Bush (son of Jeb and Columba Bush), who was once thought to be the next dynastic threat to his family for the highest office, really has to blow Paxton away. If Paxton convinces Trump to take a negative view of the offspring of the two youngest presidents of Texas, George P. could either become more MAGA roadkill or a surviving symbol of a post-Trump GOP if that ever happens.

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Is Delta-8 the same as CBD?

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Is Delta-8 the same as CBD?

This article was originally published on Real Tested CBD. To view the original article, click here.

You may have heard of Delta-8 THC but are curious what it actually is?

It’s not exactly marijuana or the traditional THC that we know about. It’s also not exactly like the cannabinoid CBD. Think of a middle ground between the two, and Delta-8-THC is somewhere in between. Let’s break down what exactly Delta-8 is and how it might be useful to you.

What is Delta-8-THC?

Delta-8-THC occurs in very low concentrations in all cannabis and hemp plants, with most of the available Delta-8-THC being made from hemp plants. Hemp and marijuana plants both belong to the cannabis plant family, although hemp typically has drastically lower levels of THC.

Delta-8 THC is a minor cannabinoid found in cannabis and hemp plants. Delta-8 THC is a close relative of Delta-9 THC (the cannabinoid most commonly associated with marijuana) with a similar molecular structure but with a few key differences. From a chemical point of view, Delta-8-THC and Delta-9-THC differ due to the location of a double bond in their molecular chain. Delta-8 THC contains the bond on the 8th carbon chain while Delta-9 THC has it on the 9th carbon chain.

How does Delta-8 affect the brain and body?

Although research around all cannabinoids is relatively new and still emerging, there is less knowledge about smaller cannabinoids like Delta-8 compared to the primary ones like traditional THC or CBD. Although there is a small difference in chemical structure between Delta-8 and Delta-9 THC, there is a noticeable difference in how both affect the body’s endocannabinoid system (ECS).

The binding of Delta-8-THC to the CB1 receptor is similar to that of Delta-9-THC, but because of its differentiation in molecular structure, the interaction is different. Delta-8-THC can bind to CB1 receptors within the ECS, but less is known about binding to CB2 receptors. Delta-8 THC users have reported effects similar to traditional THC, but less amplified. The CB1 receptor within the ECS is largely responsible for attenuating the psychoactive effects of THC, so the difference in binding could be the reason for the reported reduction in psychoactive properties.

Delta-8 THC vs. CBD

The reduced psychoactive effects of Delta-8 THC have brought comparisons to CBD. Although both cannabinoids have potentially therapeutic properties, CBD is not a psychoactive component, while Delta-8 can still be dependent on the product and its potency. CBD interacts with the CB1 and CB2 receptors in the ECS in a similar manner, however it is believed that it does not cause consciousness-awakening states and actually offsets the psychoactive properties of traditional THC.

Delta-8 THC is like a “middle ground” between traditional THC and CBD, creating a more “euphoric” feeling than a “high” that is body rather than mind based. Delta-8 is believed to contain properties useful for pain relief and relaxation, but these effects might be less severe due to Delta-8’s primary interaction with only one receptor in the ECS. Compared to CBD, Delta-8 is intended for recreational rather than therapeutic use, but that could change and more products and research emerge.

Where can I find Delta-8 THC

As the popularity of Delta-8 continues to grow, so does the discussion about the legality of Delta-8 at the federal level. Right now, Delta-8 is fine for federal use, but again, states have the power to control the use and distribution of Delta-8 THC. Some states have already started putting restrictions on Delta-8. So make yourself familiar with local laws before buying any hemp or cannabis products. It’s also important to always turn to reliable and safe sources for your hemp products to ensure legality and effectiveness.

Turn to Real Tested CBD to take the guesswork out of your next cannabis purchase. With ratings and independent laboratory test results on effectiveness, purity and quality from brands across the industry. Buying from transparent and trustworthy sources is the best way to ensure that your hemp purchase, whether or not it contains Delta-8-THC, is on the right side of your state’s laws.

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