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Xi Jinping’s Simple Solution to Teenage Video Game Addiction

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Xi Jinping's Simple Solution to Teenage Video Game Addiction

This will become less common in China.
Photo: VCG / Visual China Group via Getty Images

Tired of your kids staring at their screens all day playing Roblox, whatever that is? Frustrated with your inability to impose authority on them? Well, maybe old-fashioned authoritarianism is the solution.

In an effort to combat a particular type of screen addiction, China gaming company ordered children under the age of 18 to stop playing online video games Monday through Thursday and only allow them to play for an hour – between 8 and 11. 9 p.m. – Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays.

The Chinese agency that enforces the regulation will also set up an “anti-addiction” service that requires all online games to register. And gambling companies need to do the authentication to prevent children from simply posing as adults to break the rules.

The harsh new regulations are part of an effort to combat what a national news agency earlier this month dubbed the “spiritual opium” of gambling addiction. (Internet giant TenCent has taken important steps to restrict gamers following this assessment, possibly trying to get ahead of government mandates – some of which were launched as early as 2019.)

But they’re also part of a broader crackdown on private companies, from ride-hailing to e-commerce, that the Chinese government has launched in recent months to help the country’s largest corporations live up to President Xi Jinping’s overarching values ​​for the country adapt. (Apparently he’s not a gamer.)

Commenting on the new regulations, People’s Daily, the Communist Party’s best-known newspaper, said that “the signal of this move is very clear – the government can be” ruthless “when it comes to regulating the gambling industry.

American parents, eat your heart out.

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